Category: News

Rockcliffe Park Children’s Christmas Party 2019

This year’s Children’s Christmas Party will take place on December 8, from 2 pm to 4 pm at the Rockcliffe Park Community Hall. 

Sponsored by the Rockcliffe Park Residents Association, this event is a longstanding tradition serving local area youth each holiday season. Just up Springfield Road at the Rockcliffe Park Community Hall, well over 100 youth and their families partake in horse and carriage rides, visits with Santa, holiday craft making, and holiday cookies with hot chocolate and marshmallows. This party became immensely popular as it brings a lot of cheer to our children, and to the underprivileged youth that we support through a toy drive held at the event, under the RRCRC programs.

The Children’s Christmas Party is free to the community thanks to the support of our many volunteers and generous donors; This year’s holiday treats and gingerbread cookies have been largely funded by Metro, our local grocery store on Beechwood. “Occasions are made easy” with Metro Holiday inspiration and party catering.

page5image1279785296Mark your calendars this Sunday, bring your children and join us for lots of fun and holiday cheer!

We welcome new, unwrapped toys and school supplies, as well as smaller amount gift cards and cash for donation to needy children from Santa.

Free admission and all are welcome!

Christmas Tree Lighting and Carol Sing

Wednesday, Dec 4, 7 pm: Christmas Tree Lighting and Carol Sing, at the Rockcliffe Park Community Hall. This magic and festive annual event will kindle your Christmas spirit! Come to hear the Elmwood Children’s Choir, watch the massive evergreen light up behind the library and warm up with hot drinks, cookies and carol singing to a brass band. Song sheets are provided. Tax-deductible cheques are being collected for RRCRC families in need.

Rockcliffe Park Library

Rockcliffe Park Library Fall Programs

Join in the fun at the Rockcliffe Park Branch of the Ottawa Public Library, located at 380 Springfield Road. Programs are free to attend; pre-registration may be required (see details below). Our library is a local treasure, full of community spirit. Please join in the celebrations and share in a love of reading. For more information go to https://biblioottawalibrary.ca/en/branch/rockcliffe-parkor phone 613 580-2940 (Infoservice).

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Special PD Day Program Enjoy a musical show from award-winning children’s performer Derek McKinley.

Toddlertime Stories, rhymes and songs for toddlers and a parent or caregiver.Saturday, November 9 | 9:00 am to 4:00 pm | All ages (for families) | Bilingual

Manor Park Community Centre, Science Day Includes a Science and Math storytime, hands- on experiments, Rubik’s Cube workshop, 3D printer and green screen.

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Tuesday, November 12 | 6:15 to 8:15 pm | All ages
Music in the Stacks at Rockcliffe Park Library With music by violist Kathryn PatriciaFriday, November 15 | 10:30 to 11:30 am | All ages (for families) | Bilingual

PD Day Program: Twin Flames, Sharing Stories of Unbreakable Spirits Twin
Flames take listeners on a musical journey across Canada and the Arctic; they echo the voices of their ancestors and depict life on the land. Together,
Chelsey June (Métis) and Jaaji (Inuk, Mohawk) represent Inuit, Indigenous and Métis groups in Canada. Their songs are written in English, French and Inuktitut. Through music they share the beauty of their cultures and incorporate both traditional and western instruments.

Saturday, November 16 | 10:00 am to 3:30 pm | Various ages | Bilingual/English | Registration for some activities*

“The Art of Storytelling” Day With performances of French-Canadian stories and songs by Louis Mercier from 10:30 to 11:30 am (bilingual drop-in family program); Start-a-Story Workshop (in English) with Timm Holmes from 2:00 to 3:30 pm for children ages 6 to 12 (registration required*); puppet area available all day for self-guided storytelling with puppets. Poet and author John Barton presents a workshop from 2:00 to 6:00 pm for ages 16 and up (registration required*) entitled “The Sonnet as Daybook: How to Enhance your Writing Practice.”

Tuesday, December 10 | 6:15 to 8:15 pm | All ages
Music in the Stacks at Rockcliffe Park Library With music by harpist Susan Toman.

**Tentative** October 2019: Four-week After-School Rubik’s Cube Club: one-hour-long program where kids learn how to solve the Rubik’s Cube and work on developing speed. Led by a Rubik’s Cube competitor. Check the website for more details.

Federal election / Fall 2019 Check or update your registration elections.ca 1-800-463-6868 It's Our Vote

Federal Elections 2019

The federal election will take place on Monday, October 21, 2019.

Get out and Vote!

Check out the Ottawa-Vanier Voter Information Service for more info or follow the elections through social media.

During elections, Elections Canada’s social media accounts will provide news and information on where, when and ways to register and vote, as well as employment opportunities. Between elections, they will provide news and information on events, activities, and Elections Canada products and services.

Click this link to everything Voters should know.

View the candidates in your electoral district here.

SPREAD THE WORD!

 

RPRA’s 2nd Annual Community Get-Together and Silent Auction

RPRA’s 2nd Annual Community Get-together and Silent Auction

Friday, December 6 | 5:00 to 7:30 pm | St. Bartholomew’s Church Hall, 125 MacKay Street.

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The Rockcliffe Park Residents Association presents the second annual Community Get-together at St. Bartholomew’s Church Hall, 125 MacKay Street, in support of Rideau-Rockcliffe Community Resource Centre. Please come to support the great work the Centre is doing to serve our area’s neediest people with a food bank, job bank, skills upgrading, after-school activities, homework club, crime prevention and more. You’ll find out about their forthcoming move to the former Rideau High School and what new opportunities this move will enable. Enjoy live music from harpist, Susan Sweeney-Hermon, a children’s violin performance, complimentary prosecco, fabulous Syrian food and refreshments, a silent auction and conversation with your neighbours. Tickets are $50 and on sale now through Eventbrite https://www.eventbrite.ca/e/2nd-annual-get-together-tickets-74121951753. Info: lktouchan@gmail.com. At St. Bartholomew’s Church, 125 MacKay St.

If you would like to help in any way, or if you or someone you know would like to donate an item for the silent auction, please get in touch with us as soon as possible at secretary@rockcliffepark.ca.

BookFair Logo

Rockcliffe Park Book Fair 2019

Prepare your shelves for the 58th annual RPPS Book Fair, 1-3 November, 2019

By Sara Dobbin, RPPS Book Fair Committee

Come find your “golden ticket” at the 2019 Rockcliffe Park Public School Book Fair. Students are excited for this year’s theme: Roald Dahl. An author who appeals to both the young and young at heart, the inspiration of this award-winning author will be felt throughout this year’s event. 

Roald Dahl’s imagination has taken us on adventures to places beyond belief. His novels capture fantasy and reality in perfect balance. His first children’s novel, James and the Giant Peach, published in 1961 still carries its audience on a timeless journey, taking us away from stress and fear and placing us into a world of love and compassion. Meaningful morals are intertwined throughout his repertoire. This is one of the reasons why adults return to his stories and children are eager to read them. Some of our younger readers may have been introduced to Roald Dahl when his vivacious characters were brought to life on film by acclaimed producers like Tim Burton and Wes Anderson. You can also find productions of five of his books on Broadway! 

The RPPS Book Fair has been our school’s top fundraiser for nearly 60 years! We welcome you to visit thousands of donated books over three days in the RPPS gymnasium, Queen Juliana Hall. Matilda doppelgangers will have a field day browsing books of every genre, as well as magazines, vinyl records, puzzles and board games. Bookshelves are restocked regularly, so there are new treasures each day. Children are welcome and can be found “wondering what to read next” in our abundant children’s section. They can also explore our Craft Corner. No need to hurry home for lunch, you can enjoy a hot meal, dessert, and coffee in our Café.

Book Fair at RPPS is one of our community’s most anticipated annual events. Volunteers from the school and community work more than 4,000 hours each year. Those generous hours raised $44,000 in 2018. Proceeds are used to sponsor educational field trips, author and illustrator workshops and literary programing. For a full list of funds management visit our web page: www.rockcliffeparkbookfair.com 

We hope to see you at the 58th annual RPPS Book Fair, 1-3 November, 2019 in the Rockcliffe Park Public School gymnasium (Queen Juliana Hall – enter off Springfield Road near Buena Vista).

For more information on hours, location and volunteer opportunities, visit; 

www.rockcliffeparkbookfair.com

Follow us on:

 pastedGraphic.png RockcliffeParkBookFair pastedGraphic_1.png@ rppsbookfair  pastedGraphic_2.png RPPSbookfair. 

Speaker event at Rockcliffe Park Community Hall

Speaker Series

SPEAKER PROGRAM, FALL 2019

Join your neighbours for informal evenings with distinguished speakers. Presentations will be followed by questions, coffee and cookies. Admission is free. The Speakers Program is an initiative of the Rockcliffe Park Residents Association and is supported by the Rockcliffe Park Foundation. Details and additional information may be found at www.rockcliffepark.ca.

 

Wednesday, September 11 at 8:00 pm

Hon. Perrin Beatty, PC, OC, Head of the Canadian Chamber of Commerce

Job One for the New Government: Finding Canada’s Place in an Unfamiliar World

page3image5005936Observing that the post-World War II world we have comfortably inhabited for generations no longer exists, Mr. Beatty, President and CEO of the Chamber of Commerce and former Cabinet Minister, will comment on “job one” for whoever forms the government after October 21 – to define a new strategy for Canada’s diplomatic, security and commercial relationships.

Wednesday, October 9 at 8:00 pm

Barry Padolsky Architect, Heritage and Urban Design Professional

The Chateau Laurier: The Sorry Saga So Far

page3image5032704Well-known Ottawa architect and heritage advocate Barry Padolsky will tell us about the many angles and players that make up the intensely divisive saga of the Larco addition to the iconic Chateau Laurier Hotel. What went wrong and why? What lies ahead? Can the system be changed to better protect Canada’s and Ottawa’s heritage?

 

Wednesday, October 30 at 8:00 pm

Dr. Thierry Mesana, MD, PhD Head of the Ottawa Heart Institute

The Heart Institute in the Twenty-first Century

page3image5039536Dr. Mesana, President and CEO of the University of Ottawa Heart Institute and Emeritus Professor at the University of Ottawa, will describe the unique model of the Heart Institute, the evolving landscape of cardiac diseases, and also address the pressures and challenges on cardiac care and research, and healthcare in general.

 

 

Wednesday, December 11 at 8:00 pm

Andrew Cohen, Award-winning journalist and best-selling author

The Impeachment of Donald Trump and the 2020 U.S.Election

Andrew Cohen covered the impeachment of Bill Clinton in 1998 as The Globe and
Mail’s correspondent in Washington. This evening, he reflects on the chaotic
presidency of Donald Trump, the process of impeaching and removing a
president from office, and what it means for the presidential election of 2020.

Prevent Lyme Disease – Ottawa Public Health advisory

Lyme Disease Advisory

Ottawa Public Heath encourages residents to review their Lyme disease program to safely enjoy outdoor spaces. Below is the OPH Lyme Tick Factsheet. The councillor’s office has a limited number of tick keys available for distribution as needed.

Key messages for the prevention of Lyme disease continue to be:

  • Applying an approved insect repellent containing DEET or icaridin
  • Wearing long pants and tucking them into your socks
  • Doing a tick check on yourself, your children and pets
  • Checking your pet daily for ticks, especially if it spends time in wooded or overgrown areas
  • Removing ticks as soon as possible. If you find a tick on your body, using fine-pointed tweezers, grasp the tick’s head as close to the skin as possible and pull slowly until the tick is removed. Do not twist or rotate the tick. Do not use a match, lotion or anything else on the tick.
  • Seeing your doctor if a tick has been attached for 24 or more hours or if it appears partially or fully engorged or if you are not sure. Also see your doctor if you develop a fever and other symptoms of Lyme disease (see OPH’s website at the link below) within 32 days of having had a tick attached.

Residents may also contact Ottawa Public Health via www.ottawapublichealth.ca/lymedisease or call OPH at 613-580-6744 with any concerns.

An article for more information: Why Is Lyme Disease So Hard to Understand?
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2019/09/life-with-lyme/594736/

Rideau-Rockcliffe By-election

Congratulations to our new councillor, Rawlson King

You may contact Councillor King at:

Councillor
Ward 13 Rideau-Rockcliffe
613-580-2483
613-580-2523

Rideau-Rockcliffe By-election and candidate interviews

Following the All-candidates’ Forum at Queen Juliana Hall on Tuesday April 2nd, in which 16 candidates attended (Maurice Lamirande was ill), the organization recorded the mock council resolutions portion of the evening. Below are the resolutions and votes by the candidates to help you decide which candidate you wish to support. Thanks to Jacques Legendre, Mary Anne Smallwood and Sandy Smallwood for making this production possible.

Candidates’ votes at April 2nd 2019 Candidates Forum – AMENDED

RESOLUTION #1

WHEREAS, the downtown business district in the Rideau Street area and the residential area along King Edward avenue are adversely affected by heavy articulated-truck traffic,

WHEREAS, the City recognises that another crossing of the Ottawa River is necessary for the National Capital Region, in order to provide an alternative to the heavy articulated-truck traffic, therefore,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the City calls on senior levels of government to work to provide a solution to the problem that was created by those governments when they put in place the MacDonald-Cartier Bridge crossing.

YEA: Unanimous (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

NAY:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #2 (^ resolution was divided – 3 votes occurred)

WHEREAS, although the City recognises that another crossing of the Ottawa River is necessary,

NONETHELESS, BE IT RESOLVED THAT any new crossing of the Ottawa River must not include the discredited Kettle Island corridor, and,

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Peter Karwacki (*Patrick Mayangi – video not captured) (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

“”””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT any new crossing of the Ottawa River must not include access corridors through existing established residential communities on either side of the river, and,

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Peter Karwacki

“”””””””””””””””””””””””””””””””

FINALLY BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED THAT any new proposed crossing of the Ottawa River ought to contribute to the establishment of a ring road in the National Capital Region.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Patrick Mayangi (*Oriana Ngabirano – video not captured) (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #3

WHEREAS, Rideau-Rockcliffe community has been negatively impacted by the closure of Rideau High School, and;

WHEREAS, the building that was formerly Rideau High School will now have other community serving uses, and,

WHEREAS, the athletic field attached to the former school does not currently have an on-going care-giver body to ensure that youth in the community can continue to benefit from its use,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the City take on that care-giver role to ensure that the field is properly maintained and programmed for youth.

YEA: Unanimous (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

NAY:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #4

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa Act was amended in 2017, to recognise that the City is Officially Bilingual, and,

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s Bilingualism policy, adopted in 2001, recognises both official languages as having the same rights, status and privileges, and,

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s Bilingualism policy requires that, senior staff positions (department heads) be designated bilingual, and,

WHEREAS this last requirement is frequently by-passed by Council under the pretext that no qualified bilingual candidate could be found for the position, and,

WHEREAS it is no longer credible, in 2019, that qualified bilingual administrators cannot be found in Canada to fill such senior positions at the City,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT future searches undertaken to fill senior staff positions pro-actively seek qualified bilingual candidates as a matter of necessity.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Kasia Adamiec,

NAY: Bruce Faulkner, Chris Penton   (*Peter Heyck – video not captured), (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #5

WHEREAS, placing any allowed on-road parking places between moving traffic and designated cycling lanes provides greatly enhanced protection to cyclists, and,

WHEREAS, placing cycling lanes between any parked vehicles and the roadside curb reduces the potential for serious and potentially fatal “dooring” incidents,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the City adopt a policy of locating separated bike lanes next to the curb and never on the outside of parked vehicles.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Marc Dorgeville, Chris Penton (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #6

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa, and particularly Ward 13, contain pockets of poverty which census data has shown to be among the worst in our country; and,

WHEREAS poverty at this level inevitably leads to problems of criminality, health, housing and education; and,

WHEREAS these conditions of poor quality of life represent a badge of failure for a prosperous city,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that reduction and alleviation of poverty and its attendant vices, conditions and disabilities (in association with other levels of government), be established as a central goal of Ottawa City government.

BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the city impose a 0.75% increase to property taxes to specifically fund initiatives to address this goal.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Marc Dorgeville, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Peter Heyck

NAY: Jerry Kovacs, Oriana Ngabirano, Bruce Faulkner, Kasia Adamiec  (Penny Thompson – did not vote?)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #7

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa, receives Federal gas-tax dollars which it dedicates to Transit; and,

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s roads are in urgent need of repair,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City use any increased gas-tax dollars from the Federal government for road repairs.

YEA: Jerry Kovacs, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Johan Hamels, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #8

WHEREAS, cycling has grown in the city as the city has implemented more separated and protected bike lanes providing a safer means of cycling on busy city streets, and,

WHEREAS, enhancing cycling infrastructure is a cost-effective means of increasing Ottawa’s transportation infrastructure, and much cheaper than mass-transit improvements or increases to the road network,

THEREFORE BE IT RESOLVED THAT the City increase the budget allocation for creating separated and protected bike lanes by 10% annually over the current 4-year mandate of Council.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Rawlson King, Sheila Perry, Peter Heyck

NAY: Jerry Kovacs, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #9

WHEREAS, the City and in particular Rideau-Rockcliffe suffers from violent crime in its residential areas, and,

WHEREAS, the OTTAWA POLICE SERVICES has a provincial mandate to foster Crime Prevention as part of its policing strategy,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT Council ask that the BOARD OF THE OTTAWA POLICE SERVICES consider an enhanced collaboration with CRIME PREVENTION OTTAWA as a matter of urgent policy.

YEA: Unanimous (**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear)

NAY:

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #10

WHEREAS, the City and in particular Rideau-Rockcliffe suffers from gang-related violence in its residential areas, and,

WHEREAS, the City, over 10 years ago, created CRIME PREVENTION OTTAWA with a mandate to assist communities and the agencies existing on the ground in reducing the incidence of crime and violent behaviour,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED THAT the budget allocated to CRIME PREVENTION OTTAWA be increased by 20% in the next budgetary cycle.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Peter Heyck

NAY: Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Patrick Mayangi

(absent from vote – Bruce Faulkner)  (*Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec – video not captured)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #11

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s roads are in urgent need of repair, and,

WHEREAS it is sometimes claimed that transportation infrastructure dollars directed to road repair, even at the expense of resources supporting mass-transit, are justified as they also benefit the buses using the roadways,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that any increased tax dollars for road repairs be allocated only to roads on which buses operate.

YEA: Idris Ben Tahir, Peter Heyck

NAY: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #12

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s urban forest has been devastated by the infestation of the “Emerald Ash Borer”, and,

WHEREAS Ottawa’s tree canopy is vital to a healthy and liveable urban environment,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that replacement trees planted be sourced from a varied stock of robust native tree types so as to forestall the proliferation of future aggressive infestations.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Penny Thompson, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Bruce Faulkner  (Oriana Ngabirano – did not hear)

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

RESOLUTION #13

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s Official Plan must be updated, and,

WHEREAS Ottawa’s history of urban development has been one which allows for and even promotes sprawl, and,

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s Official Plan ought to enforce a “GROW IN NOT OUT” philosophy as a matter of urgent financial viability and environmental sustainability, even at the expense of developers demanding “choice” which inevitably means more sprawl into agricultural areas on the outer fringes, and,

WHEREAS the City of Ottawa’s planning staff has stated many times that sufficient lands exist within the urban boundary to allow for future growth,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Council directs its staff to prepare an Official Plan which allows for growth exclusively within the existing urban boundary, with no exceptions, for the next planning cycle.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Marc Dorgeville, Miklos Horvath, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry,

NAY: Jerry Kovacs, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Idris Ben Tahir, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ 

RESOLUTION #14

WHEREAS OC TRANSPO’s current fare structure is one in which its clients pay some of the very highest fares in the entire country, and,

WHEREAS that fare structure is one result of urban sprawl and of Ottawa’s policy of seeking an equality between user contribution (i.e. fares) on the one hand and subsidy from the taxpayer on the other to the OC Transpo budget, and,

WHEREAS no such ‘equallity of support’ is required from exclusive users of the road system,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Council officially abandon its policy of requiring OC Transpo’s budget to be a 50-50 mix of fares and tax subsidy.

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

NAY: Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

RESOLUTION #15

WHEREAS OC TRANSPO’s current ridership has been declining for many years, and,

WHEREAS increased use of mass transit, as well as cycling and walking, is crucial if Ottawa is to have any hope of reducing green-house gas emissions, and,

WHEREAS it is crucial that Ottawa increase the use of its mass transit system by youth if we are to have any hope of changing the declining ridership currently experienced,

THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that Council offer free ridership passes to all students of high-school age and older.

Amended to include the offer of free bus passes to seniors as well as students:

YEA: Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Bruce Faulkner, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King

NAY: Penny Thompson, Peter Karwacki, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck (*Patrick Mayangi – video not captured)

Unamended resolution (students only to get a free pass):

YEA: Johan Hamels, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Jamie Kwong, Peter Heyck

NAY: Jerry Kovacs, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Sheila Perry

(*Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec – video not captured)

………………………………………………………………………………………………

NOTES:

PRESENT:  Johan Hamels, Jerry Kovacs, Marc Dorgeville, Oriana Ngabirano, Penny Thompson, Bruce Faulkner, Idris Ben Tahir, Miklos Horvath, Rawlson King, Peter Karwacki, Patrick Mayangi, Sheila Perry, Jamie Kwong, Chris Penton, Kasia Adamiec, Peter Heyck

ABSENT:  Maurice Lamirande – called in sick.

*Video not captured – occasionally, the video recording did not capture a candidate’s vote.  This was sometimes due to the “mock clerk” being in the way or sometimes due to the hands not being visible for other reasons during both Yea and Nay votes.

(**save for Idris Ben Tahir – could not hear) – This notation appears frequently prior to resolution # 9!  The “mock clerk” was unaware that this problem existed until this resolution was called.  Subsequently, a volunteer provided assistance to Mr. Ben Tahir.

The by-election date is April 15 and the advance poll is on April 5.


Ward 13 By-Election Candidate Interview Summaries

Hear from the 17 candidates running in the April 15 by-election.  Here is the link to the three-minute Rogers  TV interviews. For French: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WpSMo…

The community association presidents from Cardinal Glen, Lindenlea, Manor Park, New Edinburgh, Overbrook and Rockcliffe Park interviewed the declared candidates for Councillor for Rideau – Rockcliffe Ward. Below are the candidates’ answers to the community associations’ questions.

The purpose of the interviews is to help our residents understand who the candidates are, what drives them to run, and what skills they bring.  There is no intent to endorse or support any candidate.

Candidates were given five identical questions one hour before their allotted interview time. Each could answer any or all of the questions in any order they chose, and to the depth they deemed appropriate. What follows is a summation of each candidate’s answers. The order of interviews and answers is based on when they registered with the City and does not indicate a rating.


Candidate #1: Marc Dorgeville

Candidate #1: Marc Dorgeville  www.marcdorgeville.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

My priorities are the environment and social issues.  I believe that an outsider can bring fresh eyes to the processes at City Hall thereby spurring badly-needed innovative thinking.  City Council needs an ideas broker able to accelerate the pace of decision-making.  I want to redress how development planning is done in this City which appears to be based, in part, on asking for citizen input and then ignoring the resulting feedback.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

My children attended a co-operative day care where parents, as a group, provided the necessary care for their, and each other’s, children.  This became a challenging environment insofar as parents often held opposing views on the nature of the care needed and the atmosphere became one of dysfunctional tension.  Knowing that nothing works better than direct, face-to-face interaction in such situations, I was able to diffuse the tension which then led to a positive collaboration among participating parents to the benefit of all the children involved.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

Rideau – Rockcliffe is a microcosm of the City by virtue of its diversity, making it an ideal model for affecting change.  City Council decisions are important for neighbourhoods, transportation, and social change, all priorities in ward 13.  I want to: increase social equality across the Ward; to encourage community participation; to leverage the important role of Community Associations; and to protect Community plans to create a virtuous circle of better health and more engaged communities.  I want to remove the barriers to positive change and to set specific targets for transportation and social housing improvement over a four-year term.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The low level of citizen engagement in Ward 13 is a major obstacle.  Whoever is elected to the Councillor position must work hard to convince folks that he or she represents everyone in the Ward and that their engagement in change processes is critical.  I recognize that the Community Associations within Ward 13 are already working on cohesion and, hopefully, the vocal and active engagement seen in our more affluent sectors within the Ward will become the norm across the Ward.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

Being a volunteer Income Tax advisor for low-income residents in Ward 13 was, for me, a transformative experience.  I empathise with and understand these challenges.  By profession, I was a climate scientist and now work in accountancy.  I have strong analytical capabilities and a fact-based approach to open – minded problem solving.  My accounting training means I can analyse budgets carefully.  This is critical since new funding for social housing and other priorities isn’t likely, so resources must be leveraged from existing program efficiencies and, most importantly, better asset management, including using these to find new revenue streams.

Candidate #2: Johan Hamels

Candidate #2: Johan Hamels www.johanhamels.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have been in politics since being the teenager who founded the Green Party of Belgium.  I believe strongly in citizen engagement and have not been impressed with how some elected officials treat their constituents.  I work as an international consultant in democracy development. I have been very active in community improvement, mostly through school councils and I place a high priority on bicycles and on improving social housing access in Ottawa.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

As Executive Director of the Green Party of Canada I inherited an organization without a clear focus, a heavy debt load, and no elected MPs.  I reshaped the organization, eliminated the debt, improved communications and by 2016 when I left the position, we had one MP elected and a healthy campaign budget surplus.  I did the same for the Green Party Belgian Regional Government and was their first elected MP.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision is to improve lives together, to make opportunity to succeed more even across the Ward.  I envision a planning process where citizen input is integrated at the get go, not too late in the process to affect change.  I envision a 4-year planning horizon for affordable housing, not a series of one-year efforts that are ineffective. I envision safe and efficient transportation on our streets for pedestrians, bicycles, bus users and cars. I see an officially bilingual City at the forefront of climate change remediation, and I see myself as a two-way bridge between the citizens of Ward 13 and City Hall.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The first challenge is to win over the Mayor and the Council since real impact depends on building effective coalitions.  This Ward is extremely diverse – I have already campaigned door to door at over 1,500 homes in all areas of the Ward, listening to citizen concerns – I believe that true understanding and empathy for problems being faced daily requires your representative to be there, in person. I also propose to speak with Councillors to get their ideas and to implement their best practices within the Ward.  Mathieu Fleury’s initiative to meet each and every business owner in his Ward is a good example of a best practice.  I will rely on youth and willing people as key elements in implementing the vision.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

My tools include: analytical capacity; citizen engagement experience; and political experience.

I have prior experience in finding program efficiencies to free up funds for higher priorities.  In Belgium, a bicycle license was required.  I demonstrated that the cost of fee collection exceeded revenues generated, leading to the removal of the license requirement.

I was able to bring more transparency to public hearings on high speed rail links in Belgium.

As described in (2) above, I was able to eliminate the deficit in Canada’s Green Party.  I delivered over $7 million dollars of solar energy funding for a school and social housing projects in Ottawa.

Candidate #3: Rawlson King

Candidate #3: Rawlson King  www.rawlsonking.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have been engaged in Community Building for over 10 years.  I am president of the Overbrook Community Association; a Board member of the Rideau-Rockcliffe Community Resource Centre for 7 years; and a member of the Community Equity Council for police services. I have been working on zoning, planning, preserving heritage buildings and acute problems of poverty and public safety. I want to improve the quality of life across the ward by dealing with acute issues such as public safety, and poverty, in particular.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

I was working with our Councilor’s office and police service to address a homophobic incident in the community.  We involved “Mediation Ottawa” to help us keep the majority of people in the room, to have a constructive dialogue around social inclusion.  I encountered resistance to the process, recognized the divergence of views, confronted the situation and succeeded in having a positive community conversation. We were able to address concerns, lower the anger and improve understanding.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

Improving the quality of life drives all my volunteer efforts.  I am results driven. I see an achievements – driven environment with an end results focus on clear and attainable goals.  I see substantial reduction in crime rates among youth which is why I helped create the Youth Strategy for the Ward. Sixty percent of crime is committed by youth, and 50% of the children in social housing live below the poverty line.  I see public safety and child poverty as mainstream concerns, not just pasted add-ons.  I see continued successes in: park designations and maintenance; and in re-configuring transit to align routes better with social housing access.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The City of Ottawa governance structure is very complex.  Council members have different viewpoints that colour their perceptions of many issues.  We need to work hard to talk it through, to have frank, fulsome discussions in a concerted effort to increase mutual understanding and move to a consensus.  That consensus must be based in a holistic view of the Ward and the City, a view ultimately driven by common sense.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am very diplomatic and try to be a good listener.  The key actors in ward 13 and the City know me and know that I am also connected to the residents in my community.  As complexity increases, silos become less and less effective, we need a holistic view of neighbourhoods.  We need social inclusion so everyone feels part of the process.  Politics is more of a role than a job – elected officials must not feel entitled.  We need to push complacent decision-makers to change their mindset away from always opting for the most politically expedient solution. I have learned that the course of least resistance doesn’t often deliver the concrete solutions needed.

Candidate #4: Jamie Kwong

Candidate #4: Jamie Kwong  www.jamiekwong.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I have worked as the Executive Director of the Quartier Vanier Business improvement Area (BIA) and the Orleans Chamber of Commerce, always in partnership with various levels of government.  While I want to exploit the synergy between local small businesses SMEs and their community, I want to come back to the community with a broadened mandate and have a direct impact on the community.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

When I arrived, the BIA lacked vision, goals and action items.  As a silo, it couldn’t generate the cohesion for meaningful change.  I built trust within the community through collaboration and I am now known for my efficiency, vision and my results focus.  Together, we achieved more beautiful streetscapes, a more walkable “Main Street”, and a stronger link between local small businesses and the community.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to Go Big and to Go Bold. Based on early consultation I want to develop an innovative collaboration experience with credible argumentation that addresses the required “what’s in it for me” to generate buy-in.  I am interested in fostering entrepreneurship through connecting SMEs to the community to achieve balanced growth.  I care about education, investment and crime prevention.  I believe Ottawa needs to grow in a balanced manner.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Most obstacles can be overcome with effective collaboration, connection and bold action.  A community vision tied to early consensus building stemming from an innovative, resourceful effort is key.  The start is neighborhood consultation where best practices are demonstrated with early feedback to show how community ideas were incorporated into the strategic plan.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have experience building effective collaborations at City Hall.  I have advocated for and continue to believe in the importance of Community-based policing to prevent crime and encourage investment.  I am a resourceful, tenacious advocate for positive change.

Candidate #5: Oriana Ngabirano

Candidate #5: Oriana Ngabirano  www.voteoriana.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to change how we do politics, to be personable and easy to relate to.  I believe that the solutions to many of our problems already exist but we can’t get past roadblocks due to a lack of will and engagement.  A positive attitude leads to positive actions and positive change.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

In Mali I worked with the Save the Children program with staff who lacked engagement.  As part of a Global Day of Action I built three separate, region tailored communications plans, all based on the basic values behind the program and linked to international goals.  The campaign re-energised the staff, received #1 ranking on social media, and led to the infusion of $26 Million in additional funding.  Mali is as diverse as Ward 13 but common alignment is the key to achieving common goals.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision for the City is the same as for the Ward.  We can live well if we work together instead of in silos.  We need better transit to connect people, we need community – based initiatives driven bottom up, not top down.  The Ottawa Community Housing model doesn’t work.  We need mixed income housing to provide role models for success.  Support for cycling will help revitalize the city as cars are replaced. I want to open youth entrepreneurship camps in the less affluent parts of the Ward.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

The largest obstacle is political apathy since only about 38% of eligible voters bother to cast a ballot.  Communications are inadequate; we need open conversations even with those who don’t vote currently to convince the 62% who do not vote of the value of political engagement.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am a solutions – oriented communicator and coalition builder.  I keep groups that I work with focused on tangible deliverables. I believe that I can bridge the urban versus rural Councillors divide at City Council, building a collaborative framework, clear visions and achieving positive, concrete actions.  The keys to success are honesty and a heterogeneous focus.

Candidate #6: Penny Thompson

Candidate #6: Penny Thompson  www.votepennyt.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I want to improve the quality of life in both the Ward and the City.  The key to achieving this is to connect people.  I have a long history of community service having headed the Manor Park Community Association (MPCA) and, more recently, being involved with the United Way SPARK program which is about women supporting women. For example, we recently funded an exciting musical project in Overbrook.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

The proposed East – West bikeway on Hemlock Avenue was of great concern to residents living on the street.  At an MPCA meeting their voices were heard clearly so I invited City staff to a follow up meeting where solutions also eluded us. I continued to work the issue and found a solution, parking pockets that was acceptable to residents and traffic planners.  Although a difficult process, I stuck with it since, in the longer term, the proposed bikeway was “the right thing to do” We make decisions now for future generations, even if it ruffles a few feathers.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want a more livable city with a neighbourhood focus.  We need more than just resident engagement – we need resident – centric decision-making so as never to have another process like the CSST in New Edinburgh.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

 The current consultation process is fatally flawed.  We need resident consultation as step one of any major project to collect input and feedback at project inception.  Right now we suffer from a lack of transparency and a lack of resident outreach in City Hall decision – making processes.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have proven time and again that I am both reliable and honourable.  I have 25 years of experience as a volunteer in Ward 13.  As MPCA Chair, I fought the island bridge proposal for 10 long years.  My connectivity skills and listening skills led to my appointment as Chair of the Environmental Stewardship Committee for the City.  In this capacity, I led the Greenhouse Gases Discussion Day.  I was also part of the Wateridge Village Advisory Group and instrumental in the redesign of St Laurent Boulevard as an integral part of Wateridge Village traffic planning.

Candidate # 7: Patrick Mayangi

Candidate # 7: Patrick Mayangi  www.patrickmayangi.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

As a 14 year resident in Ward 13, I have always lived in social housing, supporting my family with part-time jobs since I was 16.  I attained first a bachelor’s degree and then a Master’s degree in local representation in civil society. My concern is always about caring for others. I see the power of youth and I want to get youth involved in politics.  I volunteer a lot, and when I met Tobi Nussbaum he was a great inspiration to me, and a breath of fresh air.  I want to bring positive change; improve social housing and get young people represented in local politics. I want to be part of it.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

The candidate chose not to respond directly to this question

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

The City needs ambition and vision. I envision healthy vibrant communities.  The City of Berlin is an example of a Smart City, dynamic from its core to its outer extremities; so unlike Ottawa that seems to be a dormant city.  We are socially diverse in Ward 13 and we need to be aware of who our neighbours are and to understand their needs if we are going to be able to revitalize disadvantaged neighbourhoods in the Ward and the City.  Can we get school lunch programs added to our already successful school breakfast programs?  Money is the least of our problems.  Can we attract technology giants such as Shopify to bring state-of-the-art technology to our Ward? I want Rideau – Rockcliffe to be a model for other wards.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Short-sighted decisions such as the recent annulation of free university tuition programs will mean that many of my peers will be unable to fulfill anywhere near their potential to contribute to an open vital society.  We need to look past the next election cycle in decision-making for programs ripe with potential medium to longer – term benefits. Heritage is important. We cannot move into our future without understanding our past but I am mystified as to how a project such as the CSST gets supervised when cost over runs and delays are everywhere apparent.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

My youth is my best tool to motivate other youth.  Younger role models bring fresh visions.  I am already well connected to Mathieu Fleury and to the Catholic Immigration Centre where I mentor new immigrant kids on how to become part of our social fabric.  Leadership needs 3 things; moral fibre, a coherent dream, and the tenacity to pursue the vision.  I can bring great thoughts and ambitions having lived in social housing and I’m still living the reality of social housing in the neighbourhood.  My slogan is: Come Together!   Rideau-Rockcliffe because without that first step, nothing positive is possible.

Candidate #8: Chris Penton

Candidate #8: Chris Penton  www.votepenton.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I was born here and returned 10 years ago.  I developed the Vanier Market; I have chaired the Vanier Community Association; I built the new Beechwood Market; I envisioned and realized East Fest. Now I want to apply my many life lessons and my extensive local experience and connections to improving the quality of life in the Ward as your Councillor.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

I conceived and realized East Fest over the objections of City Transportation staff who strongly resisted street closures and bus diversions in collaboration with sponsors.  I provided personal bridge financing to make this a reality in the first year.  To make this happen required a common vision among collaborating community groups, all of which I facilitated.  Now in its third year, East Fest is a BIA self-sustaining success story.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I envision a safe, walkable, serviceable (pools & parks) and vibrant community focused on pedestrians and cycling.  To make it happen requires better management of existing funding and programs.  We need more resident input into transportation planning, better access to the LRT.  We need Community Policing and we need to make the economic development and bike lanes on Beechwood work better. I will schedule regular consultation meetings with all Community Associations.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Red tape at City Hall is a huge problem.  Another is the lack of transparency as in the CSST – we need to open the currently closed doors processes, to stop taking residents for granted.  Developers cannot continue to see Ward 13 as a blank canvas for development. Planning and development are key and with resident- centered processes, citizen input will be the first step in the consultation towards eventual consensus.

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I am a resourceful and committed problem solver.  I recently ran the Salvation Army Red Kettle collection campaign, organizing all facets of the operation and collecting over $500,000 in revenues.  I have owned and operated two adventure travel companies.  I step up, am fast on my feet, collaborative by nature, approachable with good listening skills and a strong work ethic. I gain trust quickly and know how to organize and work effectively with teams of volunteers.  I am an experienced, credible, connected and confident voice at City Hall ready and willing to serve.

Candidate #9: Peter Karwacki

Candidate #9: Peter Karwacki  www.peterkarwacki.blogspot.com

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

I come from Kenora in north-western Ontario and I bring a frank, no-nonsense perspective to the issues facing Ward 13 and beyond.  We need solutions to provide better life opportunities to bridge the gap between haves and have-nots.  We have issues such as transit access, food security, and homelessness along with youth-based crime that require attention now.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment.

In Kenora, access to our home was by means of a gravel road maintained by the City.  One time I complained about service only to find that mean-spirited City staff cut off all services since this was technically a common access road not owned by the Municipality.  I did my homework; took the City to court; prepared and pled my own case against City legal staff.  The result was a court order for Kenora to buy and maintain into perpetuity the road and congratulations from the presiding judge on my thorough case preparation.

  1. What is your Vision for the City, and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

I want to develop a broad-based new mindset for neighbourhood resilience.  City Hall is full of cozy relationships that seem to make cooperation easy, but doing it differently can get messy and thick skin is required.  In this, I want to continue the work of Tobi Nussbaum and to use him as a mentor to work through these complex issues.  I fear that our indebtedness is leading to a day of reckoning where resilience will take the shape of self-reliance meaning new ways to provide essential services.

  1. What are the obstacles to implementing your Vision for Ward 13, and how would you deal with them?

Tobi’s attempt to reform City Hall processes were largely rebuffed and he was intentionally sidelined.  I will continue to ask the tough questions at Council; to hold politicians and City staff accountable for their actions and their inaction.  Does anyone really think that $75,000 thrown at the Overbrook 4 corners issue will be enough to make young unemployed youth not see crime as an alternative to an unsuccessful job search?

  1. What are three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall, and how have you demonstrated their use in the past?

I have extensive pertinent experience – hospital administration; IT solutions development; Health Care Board member; Project Management expert.  I am very analytical and can use my good judgment to separate the wheat from the chaff.  I am frank to the point of bluntness (I’m working to soften that a bit) and not easily intimidated by politicians in power or by staff experts looking for expedient, least resistance solutions that are really only temporary band-aids.  I can, and will, ask the tough questions.

Candidate #10: Miklos Horvath

Candidate #10: Miklos Horvath  www.votehorvath.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 My concerns include the lack of vision and ambition in the city, indeed the layout of the city itself.  LRT is doomed without Phases 2 & 3 that are no longer certain.  Winter snow clearing, potholes repair and other municipal services are a concern.  As per Tobi, I will want to have my voice heard at Council where too many Councillors are OK with the status quo.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 In 2000, I was campaign manager for the Ottawa – Vanier PC candidate.  I started at zero and built a team of committed volunteers and raised sufficient funds to run a robust campaign in a longshot riding.  We were recognised by Joe Clark as having built a model riding association from scratch.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 I see an interconnected city with high speed rail links to Toronto and Montreal; with a regional commuter system built on existing rail lines; and reliable urban transit with transparent, public performance measures.  I see development sensitive to quality of life issues such as shade cast on nearby residences; accessible buildings; walkable, healthy neighbourhoods.  I see a public dashboard for services delivery performance measurement – how long to clear snow; to fill potholes; to collect garbage, etc.  I see rental subsidies in lieu of motel-based housing. Development is an issue for example Minto’s empty space. Small entrepreneurs are not able to afford developer’s rent and this is leading to dead zones along Beechwood. Infills do not fit the neighbourhoods.  

  1. What are the obstacles to implement your vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 All too often, developers want to build what they can sell, not what fits into the neighbourhood. With City Council split between urban core and suburban members, even best practices cannot often find a consensus.  In my line of work, internal audit, I work in a team focused on streamlining delivery processes.  We have about three months to understand a situation before recommending change.  This analytical capacity will serve me well at Council.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 I have built committed teams of volunteers who have bought into a shared vision and a new system.  I know how to get past the roadblocks placed by City Staff.  I need to learn more about complex Overbrook issues around child opportunities and crime, and I am committed to do so. I believe my focus on performance standards and transparent service delivery reporting will enable program efficiencies and a greater chance of meeting clear output targets.

Candidate #11: Peter Heyck

Candidate #11: Peter Heyck  No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 I’ve been interested in civic and political issues for some time.  While I’ve volunteered and worked for a number of federal and provincial campaigns over the years, I believe that I can do the greatest amount of good working at the local level in municipal politics.  It is the best place for me to start.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 Where I work, Canadian Blood Services in logistics, it’s important that we work together as a team in order to meet deadlines.  We ship life-saving drugs and blood products to hospitals and clinics all over Canada.  If we don’t meet deadlines, surgeries get postponed, putting patients at risk.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 I would like Ottawa to be a leader in a number of areas, such as improving our environment, improving public transit, and creating permanent housing for the transient population.  Having a permanent address is a precondition for applying for the wide range of social assistance programs available. Affordable housing does help the homeless or the transient populations who I am concerned about. I am a believer in Housing First. While it not a Ward 13 issue, I am very concerned about the Salvation Army Shelter. That many people on the street during the day is not good for the neighbourhood or businesses on Montreal Road.

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 I see City Council and the Mayor as obstacles to some of these goals.  It will be challenging to allocate funding in the City Budget to my priorities when the Mayor favours developers.  Not everyone is going to agree on how best to solve these problems, so developing positive interpersonal relationships will be key from the moment I arrive.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 My ability to communicate clearly and effectively

My ability to identify a problem and work towards a solution

My strong preference to work within a team environment in order to achieve common goals, rather than trying to go it alone (avoiding duplication and working at cross purposes).

Candidate #12: Maurice Lamirande

Candidate #12: Maurice Lamirande  mauricelamirande.com/en

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 Rideau – Rockcliffe has several issues to address.  My campaign slogan is “A Real Voice at the Table” and that voice will be yours, collectively.  I plan to hold Round Tables every 3 months to address issues in each zone of the Ward to foster two-way communication.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 As a School Board Trustee, I dealt with school closures in the 1990s and amalgamation of School Boards.  In the end, most stakeholders were happy with the results.  My success depended on communication and active listening skills at the group and individual level.  Another key element is to be respectful and build good relationships with other Councillors.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 I want to improve affordable housing particularly for Seniors who are the most vulnerable.  I will bring back building superintendents in City-owned buildings so that Seniors have someone to talk to about their concerns. I will also address drug problems and the like in mixed – use residences that used to be only for Seniors.

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 Ottawa is 25 years behind modern cities in terms of urban transit.  I favour the LRT extension but want to understand the billions of dollars cost overruns.  Why do the trains not work in winter?

We need effective LRT from Kanata to downtown and Embrun to downtown.

How did Lebreton Flats turn into such a big mess with millions of dollars wasted?

My Round Tables will ensure closer collaboration with the community and better decision making.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 Communications is my primary tool.  Mutual respect is also critical to build real collaboration. Transparency and integrity are also essential components.

One must stay positive, negativity doesn’t get one very far.  I am accepting no donations for my campaign so as to owe no one if elected. Neutrality is important – one should not be in the pocket of developers.

I am a hard worker who enjoys serving others.  From my beginnings as a bus boy at the Chateau Laurier through my School Board Trustee experience to now being a maintenance contractor, I have enjoyed providing good service to my clients and constituents.

Candidate #13: Kasia Adamiec

Candidate #13: Kasia Adamiec  votekasia.ca

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 I want to be an independent and strong voice at City Hall on behalf of Ward 13.  Community safety is a key priority for me.  Democratic processes are dear to my heart so we must respect each other while trying to build a better community. 

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 As a former Councillor’s office staff member I never left a single constituent request unanswered.  I know how City Hall operates and I have personal relationships with Councillors on both sides of the urban – suburban divide.  I want to help those who need help and to add more transparency to City Hall decision-making.  I work as an intelligence officer for the National Parole Board where, after research, I recommend the granting or withholding of parole.  The consequences of error are potentially extreme, so I do my homework carefully.  These analytical skills are key to what I offer to the Ward as Councillor.

On the Salvation Army issue, most Councillors knew that the plan was poor but they voted for it anyways so as to avoid the option of having distributed centres proposed for their own Wards.  This was NIMBY at its worst and an example of what needs to be addressed in City Hall decision-making.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 I see a city with a great quality of life.  In Ward 13 I see: a revitalised Beechwood Avenue; the ability to bike or walk to work; safe, efficient and affordable interconnectedness is my priority. City Hall needs to take a step back in catering to suburbia and develop a greater central urban focus with elements such as Community Policing, interconnectivity to the LRT, more timely snow clearance.  Here is one example – It takes me 45 minutes to get to work on a bus – I can walk it in 55 minutes.  How is it that the City can offer Orleans residents a 35 minute express service to downtown when my commute is less than 25% of the distance but takes so much longer? 

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 City Hall is currently focused on gridlock in suburbia.  There are several cliques in operation with an Us versus Them mentality.  I will not be part of a “Yes Sir” clique, even if it means going it alone at times. I want to find budget efficiencies so as to spend money in the right places on things like fixing the lack of interconnectivity to the LRT, community policing, snow clearance, bikeways, and so forth.  With services budget cuts on the way from the Ford government, we will need to work hard to find efficiencies to fund any new programs or even maintain existing ones.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 I am a determined individual, not afraid to take risks.  I am a passionate leader with great leadership skills.  I have served on Neighbourhood Watch Boards, on the Ottawa Police Youth Delivery Committee.  I am bilingual, but my languages are English and Polish.  I am committed to operate a bilingual (English – French) office and am learning French, having married into a Francophone family.

I have significant political experience; I can navigate through red tape; I know how to and am not afraid to take tough decisions whether politically positive or negative. I will work collaboratively with Community Associations and institutions such as the RRCRC, with SMEs and entrepreneurs in the Ward, to work towards effective change.

I know that there will be roadblocks at City Hall, and from the Province and I am confident in my experience and my persuasiveness to get past as many as possible.

I want to reach out to the people in the Ward who don’t see us yet as an Urban Community and to engage them in a collaborative process for positive change.

Candidate # 14: Jerry Kovacs

Candidate # 14:  Jerry Kovacs  No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 The terrible conditions of our roads and streets this winter is one force,  Municipalities should be able to deliver good quality services at an affordable cost – Ottawa can do much better.

The Salvation Army issue was badly handled with no transparency – again, we can do better.

The tensions between urban and suburban Councillors paralyses innovative thinking.  They need new infrastructure; we need better maintenance of existing infrastructure – there must be a way to bridge that gap.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

While teaching Wills & Estates class, I noted that about half of the students were attentive, the remainder not so.  I made up 40 numbered cards and distributed these throughout the class.  Then I asked the even numbered folks to move to my left, the odd numbered to the right.  This broke up the groups distracting the others and led to more attentiveness among all students.

Councillors at City Hall occupy the same seat for their 4-year term.  Why not mix them up?

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

My vision is irrelevant – I will be there to represent the vision of the Ward.  The new Official plan consultation process affords a great opportunity to bring all stakeholders together. We need more respect for Community Design Plans that have been run over by Council.

Vision must be community – based and a Councillor’s main role is that of facilitator and information gatherer along with communicator.

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

The Inner City versus Suburbia divide on Council is the largest obstacle to progress.  The Ward 13 Councillor must develop positive relationships and find areas of common agreement.  Consensus building begins with areas of agreement; next are areas of strong disagreement; finally, areas where compromise and consensus can be developed.  The object is to build consensus for win – win outcomes across the City.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

I am a dispute resolution, mediation lawyer by trade.  I am an educator committed to life-long learning.  Having run for the Councillor seat where I reside last year (Ward 14) I have a decent understanding of how City Hall works.

I would open a Community Service Office in the Ward and move into the Ward, if elected.  I will allocate 10% of the Councillor salary to community purposes within the Ward.

Candidate #15: Idris Ben-Tahir

Candidate #15: Idris Ben-Tahir  No Website Listed

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 In past years, I have run for election as an MP, Councillor, and School Board Trustee. Ottawa thinks small when it should think large. Luxembourg is the size of Ottawa but far wealthier as a banking centre.  Ottawa could become an international banking centre also.

The cost of security for Embassies in Ottawa is very high.  Consideration should be given to creating an enclave of embassies, grouping them in a common area such as at Anderson Road near Mer Bleu.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 I have a lengthy history of community service, often tied to supporting ethnic minorities such as the Somali community, Kosovar refugees, Turkish earthquake victims, compensation for Japanese-Canadians wrongfully incarcerated during WWII.  In each of these cases, extensive lobbying and negotiation gave rise to positive solution for all involved.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 

I want to bring back Community policing to reduce crime rates that are too high.  I believe that we should license sex trade workers and collect taxes from their wages as per other working Canadians.  I want to support various ethnic focused community activities centres in the Ward – whether Lebanese, Somali, Iraqi or whatever.

I want to build a southern traffic loop from Edwards to Richmond and Arnprior to divert much of the truck traffic off of HWY 417. This loop would bring added growth through housing and other investments.

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 Candidate did not answer this question directly.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 I am an active community member on the lookout to help those in need.  I have helped several ethnic communities in Ottawa and understand the issues facing them.  My military recruitment experience is also an asset.

Candidate #16: Sheila Perry

Candidate #16: Sheila Perry

  1. What is the driving force that brought you to run?

 I want to build a liveable Ottawa together.  I have been building partnerships since 2010.  I want to use my energy, my commitment, my knowledge and my passion to address the many issues facing this diverse Ward.

  1. Describe an example of your past experience when you have driven an initiative to completion in a dysfunctional or challenging environment?

 I started work on Ottawa’s Official plan in 2013 when players at City Hall were very different from those of today.  We have a great opportunity here with a new City manager to build Ottawa beyond 2016.  Over the years, I have gotten to know the key players, built trust and this has led to common understanding.  There are now 17 papers on the Ottawa web site on subjects such as Data, Transportation, Housing and so forth.

I have advocated for and made a difference to the Boys & Girls Club, Syrian refugees, disenfranchised Ward constituents.  I have been President of the Overbrook Community Association; I am the current President of the Federation of Citizens Associations and I have served in a leadership capacity on dozens of other groups.

  1. What is your vision for the City and what needs to happen in Ward 13 to make it so?

 I want to build a liveable, and better Ottawa.  We need safe neighbourhoods with engaged youth.  We need detailed data to drive fact-based decisions.  We need to have Ward meetings, strong communications and strong partnerships with Community Associations and others in this very diverse Ward.  RRCRC is pivotal to this vision.

  1. What are the obstacles to implement you vision for Ward 13 and how would you deal with them?

 There are no service delivery standards in Ottawa and no evaluation.  Time and again there is no plan, no staff, no strategy and no money to effect change.  Many among the disenfranchised within the Ward have language issues and lack even a facility to meet.

I write proposals and initiate actions that are sent to Councillors for review: Some come onside, others don’t even reply.  The split mirrors the likely 14 to 7 vote on the upcoming budget.

  1. What are the three tools in your toolbox that will make you effective at City Hall and how have you demonstrated their use in the past.

 I was very instrumental in having the Overbrook Community Centre built.  This is only one element in my extensive experience.  I am a member of the Overbrook Planning & Development Committee, and I understand the challenges of infill.  I have convinced the Committee of Adjustment to insist on community vetting prior to the review of any applications.  I am part of the Linking Leaders Group focused on reducing youth homelessness by 30%.

I am an active listener, a proven leader and a tenacious problem – solver.  I have more experience dealing with Ward issues than any other candidate and I look forward to representing Ward 13 at City Council.

Candidate #17: Bruce Faulkner

Candidate #17: Bruce Faulkner

Mr. Faulkner did not participate in the Candidates Interviews.

2019 Rockcliffe Park Spring Book Sale

2019 Rockcliffe Park Spring Book Sale

On Saturday April 27 (10 am to 5 pm and Sunday April 28 (11 am – 5 pm) at the Community Centre; in support of Rockcliffe Park Branch and literacy programs within the wider Ottawa Public Library system. Over 25,000 donated high-quality books at bargain prices. Also, Collector’s Table, DVDs, CDs and vinyl. 

Thanks to book sale sponsors Chartwell New Edinburgh Square, Guardian New Edinburgh Pharmacy and Dymon Storage. 

 

 

 

 

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